Military Fighters

F-14   F-15   F-16   F-17   F-18   AC-130   A-6   AV-8B   A-10

F-111   F-117   F-22

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These aging warriors of the Navy's fleet, which carry modern weapons, electronics and engines, cost about $38 million each. F-14s can carry up to 13,000 pounds of ordnance, including Phoenix, Sparrow and Sidewinder missiles, along with a 20 mm cannon.

F-14 Tomcat

 

Primary function: Carrier-based multirole strike fighter

Speed: 1,484 mph (mach 2.0)

Armament: Up to 13,000 pounds to include AIM-54 Phoenix missile, AIM-7 Sparrow missile, AIM-9 Sidewinder missile, air-to-ground precision strike ordnance, and one M61A1/A2 Vulcan 20mm cannon.

Crew: Pilot and radar intercept officer

Propulsion: F-14A: Two Pratt & Whitney TF-30P-414A turbofan engine with afterburners. F-14B and F-14D: Two General Electric F110-GE-400 turbofan engines with afterburners

Thrust: TF-30P-414A: 20,900 pounds (9,405 kg) static thrust per engine, F110-GE-400: 27,000 pounds (12,150 kg) static thrust per engine

Length: 61 feet 9 inches (18.6 meters)

Height: 16 feet (4.8 meters)

Wingspan: 64 feet (19 meters) unswept, 38 feet (11.4 meters) swept

Maximum Takeoff Weight: 72,900 pounds (32,805 kg)

Ceiling: Above 50,000 feet

Contractor: Grumman Aerospace Corp.

Unit Cost: $38 million

Date Deployed: First flight: December 1970

 

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f14/index.html

 


 

 

The F-15 is an all-weather tactical fighter. Called the "Starship" by pilots, the F-15 costs $15 million per plane and is the world's leading air superiority fighter. It carries an M-61 A1 20 mm cannon, four Sidewinder missiles and four Sparrow missiles.

F-15C Eagle

   

Primary function: Tactical fighter

Speed: 1,875 mph (Mach 2.5 plus)

Crew: one in F-15A/C, two for F-15B/D/E

Contractor: McDonnell Douglas Corp.

Power plant: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 or 229 turbofan engines with afterburners

Thrust: (C/D models) 23,450 pounds each engine

Wing span: 42.8 feet (13 meters)

Length: 63.8 feet (19.44 meters)

Height: 18.5 feet (5.6 meters)

Maximum takeoff weight: (C/D models) 68,000 pounds (30,844 kilograms)

Ceiling: 65,000 feet (19,812 meters)

Range: 3,450 miles (3,000 nautical miles) ferry range with conformal fuel tanks and three external fuel tanks

Armament: One internally mounted M-61A1 20mm 20-mm, six-barrel cannon with 940 rounds of ammunition; four AIM-9L/M Sidewinder and four AIM-7F/M Sparrow air-to-air missiles, or eight AIM-120 AMRAAMs, carried externally.

Unit Cost: A/B models - $27.9 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars);C/D models - $29.9 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)

Date deployed: July 1972

Inventory: Active force, 396; Reserve, 0; ANG,126.

 

http://www.af.mil/news/factsheets/F_15_Eagle.html 

 


 

 

f15E.strike.eagle.jpg

 

The F-15E is a special strike, or bomber, version of the F-15 fighter aircraft crewed by a pilot and a weapon systems officer. The $31.1 million plane features advanced laser and radar targeting systems, air-to-air missiles. It can carry any bomb in the Air Force's inventory, including the 5,000-pound GBU-28 "bunker buster" and the all-weather 2,000-pound AGM-130 guided missile.

F-15E Strike Eagle

 

Primary function: Tactical fighter

Speed: 1,875 mph (Mach 2.5 plus)

Armament: Various air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles

Crew: two for F-15B/D/E, one for F-15A/C

Contractor: McDonnell Douglas Corp.

Power plant: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 or 229 turbofan engines with afterburners

Thrust: (C/D models) 23,450 pounds each engine

Wing span: 42.8 feet (13 meters)

Length: 63.8 feet (19.44 meters)

Height: 18.5 feet (5.6 meters)

Maximum takeoff weight: (C/D models) 68,000 pounds (30,844 kilograms)

Ceiling: 65,000 feet (19,812 meters)

Range: 3,450 miles (3,000 nautical miles) ferry range with conformal fuel tanks and three external fuel tanks

Armament: One internally mounted M-61A1 20mm 20-mm, six-barrel cannon with 940 rounds of ammunition; four AIM-9L/M Sidewinder and four AIM-7F/M Sparrow air-to-air missiles, or eight AIM-120 AMRAAMs, carried externally.

Unit Cost: A/B models - $27.9 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars);C/D models - $29.9 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)

Date deployed: July 1972

Inventory: Active force, 396; Reserve, 0; ANG,126.

 

http://www.af.mil/news/factsheets/F_15_Eagle.html

 


 

The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a small multi-role fighter aircraft known for its exceptional maneuverability and diverse capabilities. Each F-16 costs $20 million or more. It carries one M-61 A1 20 mm multibarrel cannon, and up to six air-to-air missiles.

F-16 Fighting Falcon

 

Primary function: Multirole fighter jet

Speed: 1,500 mph (mach 2.0)

Power Plant: One General Electric F110-GE-129 or Pratt and Whitney F100-PW-229

Thrust: F-16C/D, 27,000 pounds

Range: More than 2,000 miles

Crew: Crew: F-16C, one; F-16D, one or two

Wingspan: 32 feet, 8 inches (9.8 meters)

Length: 49 feet, 5 inches (14.8 meters)

Height: 16 feet (4.8 meters)

Empty weight: 8,500 kg 

Maximum altitude: 50,000 ft

g limit: 9g+ 

Armament: Air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack munitions.  One M-61A1 20mm multibarrel cannon with 500 rounds; external stations can carry up to six air-to-air missiles, conventional air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions and electronic countermeasure pods

Maximum Takeoff Weight: 37,500 lbs

Mfg: Lockheed-Martin

Unit cost: $20 million

Date Deployed: January 1979

 

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f16/index.html

 


F-17 Cobra

 

Primary function: fighter

Speed:  

Armament:  

Crew:  

Mfg: Northrop

Power Plant: two General Electric 404-GE400

Length: 56' 

Height: 15' 4"

Wingspan: 37' 6"

Gross Weight: 44,000 lb

 

 

http://aeroweb.brooklyn.cuny.edu/specs/northrop/yf-17.htm 

 


 

F/A-18 and F/A-18C Hornets are dual-role attack aircraft and fighters. These twin-engine, multipurpose aircraft can cost from $24 million to $35 million, depending on the type. Some versions carry crews of one, others two. Maximum speed is Mach 1.7.

 

External payload: AIM 9 Sidewinder, AIM 7 Sparrow, AIM-120 AMRAAM, Harpoon, Harm, SLAM, SLAM-ER, Maverick missiles; Joint Stand-Off Weapon (JSOW); Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM); various general purpose bombs, mines and rockets.

FA-18 Hornet

 

Primary function: Multirole attack and fighter aircraft

Speed: 1,261 mph (mach 1.7)

Armament: One M61A1/A2 Vulcan 20mm cannon (6.000 shoots/min)

Weapons: Air/Air missiles: Sidewinder, Sparrow and AMRAAM, Air/Ground: Maverick, Harpoon and HARM, Bombs: free fall, laser guided, and cluster.
Crew: A, C, and E models are pilot only while B, D, and F models are two-seaters.

Length: 56 ft (17.1 m)

Height: 15.3 ft (4.7 m)

Wing Span: 40.4 ft (12.3 m)

Propulsion: Enhanced Performance Engine (EPE): Two F404-GE-402 engines, each in the 18,000 pound thrust class. Combat thrust-to-weight ratio greater than one-to-one

Thrust: 17,700 pounds (8,027 kg) static thrust per engine

Maximum Take Off Gross Weight: 51,900 pounds

Range: 1252.4 miles combat, 1777.9 ferry

Combat Radius: 500+ nm

Combat Ceiling: 50,000 ft 

Contractor: Prime: McDonnell Douglas; Major Subcontractor: Northrop

Unit Cost: $24 million to $35 million

Date Deployed:
First flight - November 1978
Operational - October 1983 (A/B models); September 1987 (C/D models)

 

Armament:

Up to 13,700 pounds (6,227 kg) external ordnance. Nine weapon stations; two wingtip stations for Sidewinders, two outboard wing stations for air-to-air or air-to-ground weapons, two inboard wing stations for fuel tanks, air-to-air or air-to-ground weapons, two nacelle fuselage stations for AMRAAMs, Sparrows or sensor pods, and one centerline station for fuel or air-to-ground weapons. M61A1 20-mm gun internally mounted in the nose.

 

http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/military/fa18/flash.html (Hornet)

http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/military/fa18ef/flash.html (Super Hornet)

http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/gallery/photo/F-18SRA/index.html (photos)

http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/PAO/PAIS/HTML/FS-002-DFRC.html (HARV)

http://www.fortunecity.com/campus/caldwell/375/F-18/F-18.html

http://private.freepage.de/monaco/f18.htm  (photos)

http://www.aire.org/462/ingles/pavioni.htm

http://privat.schlund.de/f/flugweb/f-18.htm

http://misc.info.kuzbass.net/bagus/avia/F-18/F-18.htm

   


 

The AC-130 gunship's primary missions are close air support, air interdiction and force protection. These heavily armed aircraft incorporate side-firing weapons integrated with sophisticated sensors, navigation and fire control systems to provide surgical firepower or area saturation during extended periods, at night and in adverse weather.

AC-130H/U Gunship

 

Primary function: Close air support, air interdiction and force protection

Speed: 300 mph

Armament: AC-130H/U: 40mm cannon and 105mm cannon; AC-130U: 25mm gun

Crew: Five officers (pilot, co-pilot, navigator, fire control officer, electronic warfare officer) and eight enlisted (flight engineer, TV operator, infrared detection set operator, loadmaster, four aerial gunners)

Builder: Lockheed/Boeing Corp.

Nickname: AC-130H Spectre       AC-130U Spooky

Power Plant: Four Allison T56-A-15 turboprop engines

Thrust: 4,910 shaft horsepower each engine

Length: 97 feet, 9 inches (29.8 meters)

Height: 38 feet, 6 inches (11.7 meters)

Wingspan: 132 feet, 7 inches (40.4 meters)

Range: Approximately 1,300 nautical miles; unlimited with air refueling.

Ceiling: 25,000 feet (7,576 meters)

Maximum Takeoff Weight: 155,000 pounds (69,750 kilograms)

Unit Cost: Between $132.4 million and $190 million

Inventory: Active duty: AC-130H, 8; AC-130U, 13; Reserve, 0; ANG, 0

 

Video MC-130

 

Flight Test with AAR-44 ECM Video

 

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/ac-130.htm

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/ac-130-pics.htm (photos)

http://www.specwarnet.com/vehicles/spectre.htm

 

 

 


 

 

 

The A-6 Intruder recently retired as the Navy/Marine Corps medium attack aircraft. This redoubtable aircraft has seen combat in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf and was the star of the Hollywood film "Flight of the Intruder." Together with its principal variant, the EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft, the A-6 Intruder has earned its place in aviation history.

 

95 Navy A-6s flew 4,045 sorties. The Marines deployed 20 A-6's flying 854 missions from land bases. Five A-6s were lost or damaged in combat; two early in the war during low-altitude attacks.

 

Wing sweepback 25 degrees at quarter-chord; outer wing panels fold upward more than 90 degrees for stowage; TRAM ball under nose, aft of radome. Survivability improvements incorporated; fire extinguishing system (halon) inerting fuel tanks; fire suppression in areas around fuselage fuel tanks wing dry foam blocks; and self-sealing fuel lines in engine cavities.

 

A little-known fact is that the Intruder delivered more ordnance during the Vietnam War than the B-52.

A-6 Intruder

 

Primary function:  Carrier-based all-weather attack aircraft, with tanker variant.

Speed:  474 mph cruise, 653 max, approach 127 mph

Armament:  Five weapon attachment points, each with a 1633 kg (3600 lb) capacity (max external stores load 8165 kg; 18,000 lb). Typical weapon loads are 28 500 lb bombs in clusters of six, or three 2000 lb general purpose bombs plus two 1135 litre (300 US gallon; 250 Imp gallon) drop tanks. AIM-9 Sidewinder can be carried for air-to-air use. Harpoon missile capability added to weapons complement of A-6E/TRAM. The HARM missile has been test flown on the A-6E. Up to 20 Brunswick Defense AN/ADM-141 TALD (Tactical Air-Launched Decoy) gliders, or two in addition to normal bomb load. Flight and firing tests have been carried out with the AGM-123A Skipper II, also on an A-6E.

Crew:  2

Power Plant: Two Pratt & Whitney J52-P-8A turbojets

Thrust: 9300 lb 

Length: 54 ft 9 in

Height: 16 ft 2 in

Wing span: 53 ft 0 in

Fuel load: internal: 15,939 lb, external (five tanks): 10,050 lb

Fuel Capacity: 2344 US gallons

Weight empty: 27,613 lb

Max T-O weight: catapult: 58,600 lb

Max landing weight: carrier: 36,000 lb

Max rate of climb: 7620 ft/min

Service ceiling: 42,400 ft

Range with max military load: 1011 miles

Range without load: 3,300 miles

Mfg: Grumman

Date Deployed: 1960 Test, 

Date Retired: 1997

Inventory: 482 Navy (A-6As) by 1963, 687 total

 

 

 

http://www.danshistory.com/a6.html

http://www.topedge.com/alley/images/a6/a6img.htm (photos)

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/a-6-pics.htm (photos)

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/a-6.htm

http://www.yellowairplane.com/pics/CV63_A6_1.htm

http://pacificcoastairmuseum.org/pcam_aircraft/a6/a6.html

http://www.state.sc.us/patpt/a6.htm

http://home.hetnet.nl/~wetting/index.html (photos)

 


 

 

The versatile, British-designed Harrier attack jet can take off and land vertically, much like a helicopter. The $24 million aircraft has a top speed approaching Mach 1 and carries both air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons, including the missile. Harriers fought dramatically and effectively in the British conflict with Argentina over the Falkland Islands.

AV-8B Harrier

 

Primary Function: Attack and destroy surface targets under day and night visual conditions.

Contractor: McDonnell Douglas

Power Plant: One Rolls Royce F402-RR-406 or F402-RR-408 turbofan engine
Thrust: F402-RR-406: 21,500 pounds, F402-44-208: 23,400 pounds

Length: 46.3 feet (14.11 meters)

Height: 11 feet, 7 inches

Wingspan: 30.3 feet (9.24 meters)

Speed: 630 mph, Subsonic to transonic 

Ceiling: 

Weight: empty: 12,800 pounds
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 31,000 lbs short takeoff, 18,900 lbs for vertical 
Range
: 1600 miles, 2416.64 miles (ferry)

Combat radius: close air support: 163 nautical miles (187.45 miles) with 30 minutes time on station interdiction: 454 nautical miles (522.45 miles)

Armament: Seven external store stations, comprising six wing stations for AIM-9 Sidewinder and an assortment of air-to-ground weapons, external fuel tanks and AGM-65 Maverick missiles; one centerline station for DECM pod or air-to-ground ordnance. A GAU-12 25MM six-barrel gun pod can be mounted on the centerline and has a 300 round capacity with a lead computing optical sight system (LCOSS) gunsight.

Crew: One

Date Deployed:  

12 January 1985, AV-8BII (Plus) introduced in June 1993.

Unit Cost:  

Inventory: 

 

http://www.history.navy.mil/planes/av8.htm

http://www.av8b.org/index.htm

http://www.av8b.org/website/us/aircraft.htm (photos)

http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/av-8.htm (photos)

http://www.photovault.com/Link/Military/Marines/Aircraft/AV-8BHarrier.html (photos)

http://www.danshistory.com/av8b.html

http://ppe.navair.navy.mil/aircraft/aircraft/av8.htm

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/av-8.htm

http://www.periscopeone.com/demo/weapons/aircraft/attack/w0003089.html

http://the_kitsune.tripod.com/Rifts-Earth-Vehicles/GAW_AV8B_Harrier.htm

 


 

 

The A-10, known among pilots as the Warthog, is designed to fly low and destroy tanks. Each aircraft costs $8.8 million and takes a crew of one. The A-10 carries a 30 mm GAU-8/A seven-barrel Gatling gun, and up to 16,000 pounds of mixed ordnance.

A-10 Thunderbolt (also known as "Warthog")

 

Primary Function: A-10 - close air support, OA-10 - airborne forward air control.  Anti-tank.

Contractor: Fairchild Republic Co.

Power Plant: Two General Electric TF34-GE-100 turbofans
Thrust: 9,065 pounds each engine

Length: 53 feet, 4 inches (16.16 meters)

Height: 14 feet, 8 inches (4.42 meters)

Wingspan: 57 feet, 6 inches (17.42 meters)

Speed: 420 miles per hour (Mach 0.56)

Ceiling: 45,000 feet (13,636 meters)

Maximum Takeoff Weight: 51,000 pounds (22,950 kilograms)

Range: 800 miles (695 nautical miles)

Armament: One 30 mm GAU-8/A seven-barrel Gatling gun; up to 16,000 pounds (7,200 kilograms) of mixed ordnance on eight under-wing and three under-fuselage pylon stations, including 500 pounds (225 kilograms) of Mk-82 and 2,000 pounds (900 kilograms) of Mk-84 series low/high drag bombs, incendiary cluster bombs, combined effects munitions, mine dispensing munitions, AGM-65 Maverick missiles and laser-guided/electro-optically guided bombs; infrared countermeasure flares; electronic countermeasure chaff; jammer pods; 2.75-inch (6.99 centimeters) rockets; illumination flares and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.

Crew: One

Date Deployed: March 1976

Unit Cost: $9.8 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)

Inventory: Active force, A-10, 143 and OA-10, 70; Reserve, A-10, 46 and OA-10, 6; ANG, A-10, 84 and OA-10, 18

 

Mission

The A/OA-10 Thunderbolt II is the first Air Force aircraft specially designed for close air support of ground forces. They are simple, effective and survivable twin-engine jet aircraft that can be used against all ground targets, including tanks and other armored vehicles.

Features

The A-10/OA-10 have excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and are highly accurate weapons-delivery platforms. They can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings (303.3 meters) with 1.5-mile (2.4 kilometers) visibility. Their wide combat radius and short takeoff and landing capability permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. Using night vision goggles, A-10/ OA-10 pilots can conduct their missions during darkness.

Thunderbolt IIs have Night Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS), goggle compatible single-seat cockpits forward of their wings and a large bubble canopy which provides pilots all-around vision. The pilots are protected by titanium armor that also protects parts of the flight-control system. The redundant primary structural sections allow the aircraft to enjoy better survivability during close air support than did previous aircraft.

The aircraft can survive direct hits from armor-piercing and high explosive projectiles up to 23mm. Their self-sealing fuel cells are protected by internal and external foam. Manual systems back up their redundant hydraulic flight-control systems. This permits pilots to fly and land when hydraulic power is lost.

The Thunderbolt II can be serviced and operated from bases with limited facilities near battle areas. Many of the aircraft's parts are interchangeable left and right, including the engines, main landing gear and vertical stabilizers.

Avionics equipment includes communications, inertial navigation systems, fire control and weapons delivery systems, target penetration aids and night vision goggles. Their weapons delivery systems include heads-up displays that indicate airspeed, altitude, dive angle, navigation information and weapons aiming references; a low altitude safety and targeting enhancement system (LASTE) which provides constantly computing impact point freefall ordnance delivery; and Pave Penny laser-tracking pods under the fuselage. The aircraft also have armament control panels, and infrared and electronic countermeasures to handle surface-to-air-missile threats. Installation of the Global Positioning System is currently underway for all aircraft.

The Thunderbolt II's 30mm GAU-8/A Gatling gun can fire 3,900 rounds a minute and can defeat an array of ground targets to include tanks. Some of their other equipment includes an inertial navigation system, electronic countermeasures, target penetration aids, self-protection systems, and AGM-65 Maverick and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.

http://www.af.mil/news/factsheets/A_10_OA_10_Thunderbolt_II.html 

http://www.a-10.org/photos/photos2.asp (photos)

http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/a-10.htm 

http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/us/DailyNews/military_a10.html 

 


 

 

F-111 Aardvark

 

Primary function:  

Speed:  

Armament:  

Crew:  

 

 

Mfg: General Dynamics

 

Photos

 

F111 was one of the first aircraft designed for "Safe Life" as a result of the Aircraft Structural Integrity Program in the USA (1956). However, following several early aircraft losses, it was realized that relatively small flaws escaping detection during NDI at manufacture could lead to catastrophic failure in the highly stressed, high strength steel structure following a period of fatigue growth in a very short time frame. This led to the application of fracture mechanics principle to aircraft design and was used in the F111 recovery program in the form of the cold proof test. At the test temperature of - 40C, the fracture toughness of the steel is reduced so that at critical load, small flaws undetectable by NDI can cause catastrophic failure. If the aircraft does not fail, then fracture mechanics principles can be used to predict a period of safe operations before the "proof test" flaw size grows to critical flaw size under normal operating conditions. F111 is the only aircraft ever built to depend for safety of operation on this test. This paper will briefly describe the history and technical basis for the Cold Proof Test, shortly to be established at RAAF Amberley.

 

http://www.ndt.net/article/apcndt01/papers/912/912.htm

http://www.jlhull.com/aircraft/F111.htm

http://f-111.net/other.htm 

http://photo.starnet.ru/Thematic_Wallpapers/Aviacija_i_kosmonavtika/Istrebiteli_i_shturmoviki/GD_F-111/pages/F111_6.htm (photos)

http://web.bryant.edu/~history/h364proj/summ_99/trainor/fb_a.htm 

 


 

The F-117 Nighthawk stealth fighter is the world's first operational radar-avoiding aircraft. This twin-engine aircraft costs about $45 million, can fly at high subsonic speeds and carries weapons in an internal bay.

F-117 Nighthawk

 

Primary function: Fighter/attack

Speed: sub mach 1

Armament: Two each of:

2 MK84 2000-pound
2 GBU-10 Paveway II
2 GBU-12 Paveway II
2 GBU-27 Paveway III
2 BLU 109
2 WCMD
2 Mark 61

 

Crew: one

 

Photo1

 

F-117 Video

 

Specifications

Primary Function

Fighter/attack

Contractor

Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co.

Power Plant

Two General Electric F404 engines

Length

65 feet, 11 inches (20.3 meters)

Height

12 feet, 5 inches (3.8 meters)

Weight

52,500 pounds (23,625 kilograms)

Wingspan

43 feet, 4 inches (13.3 meters)

Speed

High subsonic

Range

Unlimited with air refueling

Armament

Internal weapons carriage

Two each of:

2 MK84 2000-pound
2 GBU-10 Paveway II
2 GBU-12 Paveway II
2 GBU-27 Paveway III
2 BLU 109
2 WCMD
2 Mark 61

Unit Cost $FY98
[Total Program]

$122 million

Unit Cost $45 million

Crew

One

Date Deployed

1982

Inventory

Active force, 54; ANG, 0; Reserve, 0

PMAI
Primary Mission Aircraft Inventory

 

Only combat-coded aircraft and not development/ test, attrition reserve, depot maintenance, or training aircraft.

36 aircraft

 
VRML 3-D Model

F-117A Nighthawk
VRML by Soji Yamakawa

F-117

 

 

http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/f-117.htm (photos)

http://www.jetplanes.co.uk/f117.html 

http://www.holloman.af.mil/photos/117pho.html  (photos)

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Hangar/3314/f117.html

http://photo.starnet.ru/Thematic_Wallpapers/Aviacija_i_kosmonavtika/Istrebiteli_i_shturmoviki/Lockheed_F-117/pages/F117_2.htm   (slide show)

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f117/

http://www.af.mil/news/factsheets/F_117A_Nighthawk.html

 


 

 

F-22 Raptor

 

Primary function: Fighter/attack

Speed: high supersonic

Crew:

Replaces: F4, F111, F15

Wingspan: 44 feet 6 inches 

Length: 62 feet 1 inch 

Height: 16 feet 5 inches 

Powerplant: two F119-100 from Pratt and Whitney 

Thrust: 156 kN 

Auxiliary power unit: G250, 335 kW Allied Signal Aerospace 

Weapons: M61A2 Vulcan Cannon
AIM-9M Sidewinder missile
AIM-120 AMRAAM Advanced Medium Range Anti-Air Missile
Joint Direct Attack Munition 

 

F-22 Video

 

  The F-22 is being developed to counter the increasing sophistication and threat of hostile air forces and integrated air defense systems in use around the world. This fighter will provide air dominance and a precision ground attack  capability for US forces well into the 21st century.

 

 

http://www.f-22raptor.com/index_ie.htm

http://www.f22-raptor.com

http://www.codeonemagazine.com/f22/index.html

http://www.af.mil/lib/airpower

http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/military/f22/f22photos.htm

http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f22/index.html 

 


 

missing JSF (Joint Stroke Fighter)

missing F-104

   

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